Italian Dual Citizenship

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Assuming you already have an appointment with the Italian Consulate that has jurisdiction over the State where you reside AND assuming you have gathered all the required Italian Vital Records, Naturalization Records, US Vital Records (Apostilled and translated to Italian) including properly filled-out application forms, this is generally what you should expect when you walk into the Italian Consulate the day of your meeting: 

If you are an Italian Dual Citizen and you are traveling to Italy (a dream that many of us have…) or to any other EU country, you might have asked yourself: which passport should I use when I land in Italy? Italian or US? The answer is: either one. 

To avoid the long wait time for appointments at the Italian Consulates here in the US, you can establish residency in Italy and apply for Italian Dual Citizenship in-person. We call this “FAST-TRACK”.

The Italian law requires that your Italy-born Ancestor did not become a naturalized US citizen (or citizen of any foreign country where he or she migrated to) before the birth of his or her son or daughter here in the US. Moreover, under the principle of “jure sanguinis”, i.e. continuity of blood, you, as the applicant, have to demonstrate that the descendants of the Italy-born Ancestor did not renounce their rights to Italian citizenship.

A person with dual citizenship is a citizen of two countries at the same time. While the United States allows dual citizenship without necessarily promoting it, not all countries do. Fortunately, Italy, along with Australia, Canada, UK, Ireland and a few others allow dual nationality without any restrictions. 

There are several ways to obtain dual citizenship with Italy: 

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