Italian Dual Citizenship

Congratulations on deciding to begin the process of applying for Italian Dual Citizenship! This is the only place where you will find FREE tools to help you determine whether you qualify or not, detailed information on the requirements for Italian citizenship based on the current law and guidance on the necessary documentation that needs to be gathered. You will also be able to read about the experience that some of our customers, who went through the whole process, kindly shared with us. So, let's get started!

 

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Qualification Requirements: your father or mother(*) was born in Italy, was an Italian citizen at the time of your birth, and neither you nor your parent have ever renounced Italian citizenship.   

(*) Additional Requirements: if you are using your mother, you must be born ON or AFTER January 1, 1948.

Documentation Needed: if eligible, you must obtain the following documents (newly issued in long form, certified, apostilled and translated to Italian):

  • Your father's birth record
  • Your father's certificate of Italian citizenship from Italy, also known as "Certificato di Trascorsa Cittadinanza Italiana" (Note: Check if your Italian Embassy and Consulate require this certification)
  • Your mother's birth record
  • Your parents' marriage record 
  • The applicable parent’s record of naturalization, or proof that he/she never naturalized
  • Death certificate for the parent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your birth record
  • Your marriage record
  • Divorce decrees for you and/or your parents (if applicable)
  • Records of additional marriages for you and/or your parent through whom you are seeking citizenship (if applicable)

In addition, you will have to provide a copy of your passport, driver's license and one utility bill to confirm your actual residence AND you will have to fill out up to four (4) application forms, stating that neither you nor your ascendants ever renounced Italian citizenship before any Italian authority, listing all the places of residence:

Form 1 – Application of Italian Citizenship
Form 2 – Application of Italian Citizenship 
Form 3 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for any living ascendants)
Form 4 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for ALL deceased ascendants)
AIRE Form - Census for All Italian Citizens Residing Abroad
NOTE: You don’t need to have these forms notarized. 

All US vital records must be issued in "LONG FORM" and have to be in "CERTIFED COPY". You must request the Vital Statistics Authority to state the CITY OF BIRTH, listing only the "County" of birth will not be accepted.

If you qualify through one of your Italy-born parents, we can assist you with your application from Start-to-Finish or by choosing from our "à la Carte" menu. Get Started Now!

Qualification Requirements: Your father or mother was born in the US or a country other than Italy, his or her parent (your grandparent) was born in Italy and was an Italian citizen at the time of your parent’s birth (*), and neither you nor your parent ever renounced Italian citizenship.

(*) Additional requirements: If you are using your father's mother, your father must be born ON or AFTER January 1, 1948. If you are using your mother's mother, your mother must be born ON or AFTER January 1, 1948. 

Documentation Needed: if eligible, you must obtain the following documents (newly issued in long form, certified, apostilled and translated to Italian):

  • Your grandfather's birth record
  • Your grandfather's certificate of Italian citizenship from Italy, also known as "Certificato di Trascorsa Cittadinanza Italiana" (Note: Check if your Italian Embassy and Consulate require this certification)
  • Your grandmother's birth record
  • Your grandparents' marriage record
  • The applicable grandparent’s record of naturalization, or proof that he/she never naturalized
  • Death certificate for the grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your father's birth record
  • Your mother's birth record
  • Your parents' marriage record
  • Death certificate for the parent in your direct line of eligibility
  • Your birth record
  • Your marriage record
  • Divorce decrees for you and/or your parents and/or your grandparents (if applicable)
  • Records of additional marriages for you and/or the parent and/or the grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship  (if applicable)

In addition, you will have to provide a copy of your passport, driver's license and one utility bill to confirm your actual residence AND you will have to fill out up to four (4) application forms, stating that neither you nor your ascendants ever renounced Italian citizenship before any Italian authority, listing all the places of residence:

Form 1 – Application of Italian Citizenship
Form 2 – Application of Italian Citizenship 
Form 3 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for any living ascendants)
Form 4 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for ALL deceased ascendants)
AIRE Form - Census for All Italian Citizens Residing Abroad
NOTE: You don’t need to have these forms notarized. 

All US vital records must be issued in "LONG FORM" and have to be in "CERTIFED COPY". You must request the Vital Statistics Authority to state the CITY OF BIRTH, listing only the "County" of birth will not be accepted.

If you qualify through one of your Italy-born grandparents, we can assist you with your application from Start-to-Finish or by choosing from our "à la Carte" menu. Get Started Now!

Qualification Requirements: Your grandfather or grandmother was born in the United States or a country other than Italy, his or her parent (your great-grandparent) was born in Italy and was an Italian citizen at the time of your grandparent’s birth (*), and neither you, your parent, nor your grandparent ever renounced Italian citizenship.

(*) Additional Requirements: if you are using your Italy-born Female Ancestor, you have to make sure the next in line was born ON or AFTER January 1, 1948.

Documentation Needed: if eligible, you must obtain the following documents (newly issued in long form, certified, apostilled and translated to Italian):

  • Your great-grandfather's birth record
  • Your great-grandmother's birth record
  • Your great-grandparents' marriage record
  • The applicable great-grandparent’s record of naturalization, or proof that he/she never naturalized
  • Death certificate for the great-grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your grandfather's birth record
  • Your grandmother's birth record
  • Your grandparents' marriage record
  • Death certificate for the grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your father's birth record
  • Your mother's birth record
  • Your parents' marriage record
  • Death certificate for the parent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your birth record
  • Your marriage record
  • Divorce decrees for your you, and/or your parents, and/or your grandparents, and/or your great-grandparents (if applicable)
  • Records of additional marriages for you, and/or your parent, and/or your grandparent, and/or your great-grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship  (if applicable)

In addition, you will have to provide a copy of your passport, driver's license and one utility bill to confirm your actual residence AND you will have to fill out up to four (4) application forms, stating that neither you nor your ascendants ever renounced Italian citizenship before any Italian authority, listing all the places of residence:

Form 1 – Application of Italian Citizenship
Form 2 – Application of Italian Citizenship 
Form 3 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for any living ascendants)
Form 4 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for ALL deceased ascendants)
AIRE Form - Census for All Italian Citizens Residing Abroad
NOTE: You don’t need to have these forms notarized. 

All US vital records must be issued in "LONG FORM" and have to be in "CERTIFED COPY". You must request the Vital Statistics Authority to state the CITY OF BIRTH, listing only the "County" of birth will not be accepted.

If you qualify through one of your Italy-born great-grandparents, we can assist you with your application from Start-to-Finish or by choosing from our "à la Carte" menu. Get Started Now!

 

Qualification Requirements: Your great-grandfather or great-grandmother was born in the United States or a country other than Italy, his or her parent (your great-great-grandparent) was born in Italy and was an Italian citizen at the time of your grandparent’s birth(*), and neither you, your parent, your grandparent, nor your great-grandparent ever renounced Italian citizenship.

(*) Additional Requirements: if you are using your Italy-born Female Ancestor, you have to make sure the next in line was born ON or AFTER January 1, 1948.

Documentation Needed: if eligible, you must obtain the following documents (newly issued in long form, certified, apostilled and translated to Italian):

  • Your great-great-grandfather's birth record
  • Your great-great-grandmother's birth record
  • Your great-great-grandparents' marriage record
  • The applicable great-great-grandparent’s record of naturalization, or proof that he/she never naturalized
  • Death certificate for the great-great-grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your great-grandfather's birth record
  • Your great-grandmother's birth record
  • Your great-grandparents' marriage record
  • Death certificate for the great-grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your grandfather's birth record
  • Your grandmother's birth record
  • Your grandparents' marriage record
  • Death certificate for the grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship
  • Your father's birth record
  • Your mother's birth record
  • Your parents' marriage record
  • Death certificate for the parent through whom you are seeking citizenship 
  • Your birth record
  • Your marriage record
  • Divorce decrees for you and/or your parents, and/or your grandparents, and/or your great-grandparents, and/or your great-great-grandparents (if applicable)
  • Records of additional marriages for you/the parent/grandparent/great – grandparent/great-great-grandparent through whom you are seeking citizenship  (if applicable)

In addition, you will have to provide a copy of your passport, driver's license and one utility bill to confirm your actual residence AND you will have to fill out up to four (4) application forms, stating that neither you nor your ascendants ever renounced Italian citizenship before any Italian authority, listing all the places of residence:

Form 1 – Application of Italian Citizenship
Form 2 – Application of Italian Citizenship 
Form 3 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for any living ascendants)
Form 4 – Application of Italian Citizenship (for ALL deceased ascendants)
AIRE Form - Census for All Italian Citizens Residing Abroad
NOTE: You don’t need to have these forms notarized. 

All US vital records must be issued in "LONG FORM" and have to be in "CERTIFED COPY". You must request the Vital Statistics Authority to state the CITY OF BIRTH, listing only the "County" of birth will not be accepted.

If you qualify through one of your Italy-born great great grandparents, we can assist you with your application from Start-to-Finish or by choosing from our "à la Carte" menu. Get Started Now!

A foreign woman who married an Italian citizen before April 27, 1983 automatically acquired Italian citizenship. (Law n. 555/1912 granted Italian citizenship by marriage to women only). Law n.91 of February 5, 1992 states that the male or female (foreign or stateless) spouse of an Italian citizen may apply for Italian citizenship after he/she has legally resided in Italy for at least six months, or after three years from the date of marriage if he/she resides abroad.

There are two procedures depending on the sex of the applicant and the marriage date:

1. FOR WOMEN MARRIED TO ITALIAN MEN BEFORE APRIL 27, 1983

This case follows a simplified procedure and requires only the following:

  • APPLICATION, with a copy of the passport and driver’s license
  • BIRTH CERTIFICATE of the applicant. If the applicant was born in the United States this must be a  “certified copy” (“long form” or “full form”) with an Apostille from the Secretary of State of the State where it was issued + Translation to Italian 
  • Affidavit of no divorce/separation

If you are applying for Italian Dual Citizenship through your "female" line, you may fall in the category of those born to an Italian female ancestor before 1948. For example: your mother's father was born in Italy; he did not become a naturalized US citizen before her birth which makes you eligible, but because your were born before 1948, you do not qualify. If you fall in this category, there is a way out. Let's learn more. 

The 1948 Rule and who is affected

The current law granting Italian citizenship jure sanguinis states that women could hold but not pass citizenship to children born before January 1, 1948, the date Italy became a Republic. According to the 1912 citizenship law, only men were allowed to transfer Italian citizenship to their children. Not only does this eliminate many from qualifying for citizenship but under this provision of the law there are clearly situations where one sibling and their offspring can qualify while others born before the 1948 date and their subsequent families cannot qualify. When exploring Italian citizenship jure sanguinis individuals may believe the 1948 Rule on its surface to be unfair or discriminatory but it is the law as it currently exists.

How and where the appeal the 1948 Rule

The Italian Supreme Court recently held that this provision is contrary to the Constitutional principles, particularly to the principle of equality between men and women.Thus, also children who are born before 1948 to an Italian mother, may file a motion to appeal the "1948 Rule" and obtain, if eligible, Italian citizenship. There have been recent court challenges to this aspect of the law that have been filed and adjudicated by the courts in Rome. Even though a challenge to the law has been successful in Italy, the Italian government has not yet chosen to modify or amend the current law. US Italian Consulates and other Italian Consulates outside of Italy strictly adhere to the current 1948 Rule and will probably continue to do so until the law is amended.Because jure sanguinis citizenship involves Italian law as opposed to US law, courts in the US have no jurisdiction over the matter. They will not entertain challenges or questions regarding its components.
Since the orientation of Italian Authorities (Ministry, Town Halls and Italian Consulates) is still to reject Italian citizenship applications, the legal action to be filed at the Court House in Rome is your only way to obtain citizenship.

Let's get started

If faced with the 1948 Rule outside of Italy your options are very limited. Because there has been some success challenging the law in Italy your only possible course of action may be to consult an Italian attorney who is familiar with the issue. He or she may be able to guide you through an alternative route using the Italian legal system and may be best able to help you determine if you have standing to sue in Italy and if your family fits the criteria for citizenship. 

We have partnered with a Law Firm in Italy that will assist you throughout the process. The standard fees for the full assistance with the motion to appeal are €4.500: €3.000 before the start of the law suit and €1.500 once the process is completed. The fees do not include the expenses connected to the law suit (government fees: approximately €750). Please note that these fees do not include the cost of the actual application which will have to be put together before the law suit can even begin.

Timeline: The process can take up to 2 or 3 years to be finalized.

For more information and to get started, SCHEDULE A TELEPHONE CONSULTATION with us!

You can only apply with the Italian Consulate that has jurisdiction over the State where you reside. 

NOTE: As of July 8th, 2014 all applications for the recognition of the Italian citizenship Jure Sanguinis (by descent) and Jure Matrimonii (in case of foreign national whose husband is an Italian citizen married prior to April 27, 1983) are subject to the PAYMENT OF A € 300 FEE (Law n. 66 April 24th, 2014 and modifications Law n. 89 June 23rd, 2014 art. 5-bis, comma 1). The application fee is NON REFUNDABLE, regardless of the outcome of the petition.

Fast-Track Applications are a great way to acquire your Italian Dual Citizenship; cut the wait time in half and enjoy living in Italy while your application is processed at the Italian municipality. 

What is Fast-Track?

There is an alternative way of applying for your Italian Dual Citizenship directly in Italy rather than at one of the Italian Consulates in the country where you are currently a resident.  For example, if you are faced with a long wait time for your appointment at your US Consulate, you can travel to Italy and apply in person.  Of course, there are several rules and procedures that apply to allow this “Fast Track Application” process to work in your favor.

Although there likely is no “wait” time for an appointment in Italy, you still must gather all the same documentation as if you were applying locally in the US or in your country of residency prior to arriving in Italy. Recognize that putting together an application, with Italian and US vital records, apostilles and translations to Italian, certified Naturalization Records, amendments (if applicable), etc. may take a while. Thus, the process of preparing your application takes the same amount of time whether you apply in the US or in Italy and that cannot be fast tracked.

A person with dual citizenship is a citizen of two countries at the same time. While the United States allows dual citizenship without necessarily promoting it, not all countries do. Fortunately, Italy, along with Australia, Canada, UK, Ireland and a few others allow dual nationality without any restrictions. 

There are several ways to obtain dual citizenship with Italy: 

1. Through Ancestry, i.e. jure sanguinis (by right of blood)

2. Through Marriage

3. Legally residing in Italy for a certain number of years

But why would somebody go through this lengthy and expensive process? There are obviously numerous advantages to having a dual passport:

- Residing in Italy without the need of a long-stay visa, quite desirable if you are planning to retire there

- Attending school at the local tuition rate

- Working in Italy or in any European Union country without the need of applying for a work permit

- Minor children automatically become Italian citizens when you apply

- Reconnecting to your Italian Roots by immersing in the culture of your Ancestors and learning the Italian  language (NOTE: Speaking the Italian language is not a requirement to apply for Italian Dual Citizenship jure sanguinis)

Having said that, if you are thinking of applying for Italian Dual Citizenship, you need to be aware that you will be bound by the laws of both Italy and the US. Fortunately, Italy does not have mandatory military service anymore. 

For issues regarding double taxation, Italy and the US have income tax treaties to avoid just that. More HERE. However, because tax laws are complicated and can change often, you should consult with a qualified tax accountant.  

If you are a US national, Italy does not require citizenship to own a property there.  Also in this case, it is advisable you seek professional help, if you are planning to purchase a home in Italy. 

Finally, it is always best to learn the pros and cons before pursuing your dream of becoming an Italian Dual Citizen. Remember, once you choose to move forward, whether you are just getting started, or need help getting to the finish line, sign up for a TELEPHONE CONSULTATION  with us, and we can answer your questions and get you started right away! 

You are about to embark on the journey to Italian Dual Citizenship, but before getting started you are wondering about the costs involved. Wise thinking!

The cost varies based on how many generations exist between you and your Italian ancestor who emigrated to your country.  For instance, these are the costs that you will likely incur:

1. You will need your Italian ancestor’s birth, marriage and death certificates, as applicable.

2. A certified copy of your Italian Ancestor's Naturalization papers or, in case he or she was never naturalized, you will need to perform some additional research in the Census Records and with the National Archives.

3. New official and certified copies of birth, marriage divorce and death records of all your ancestors in your lineage from your native/current country, including your own.  These are usually ordered from your State or Province vital statistic offices.

4. You will need to have your State or Province provide you with an International Apostille or legalization for each document.

5. These non-Italian documents (with the exception of the Naturalization documents and Apostilles) will need to be translated to Italian.

6. The Italian Consulate where you will officially apply for citizenship will charge you an application fee. As of July 8th, 2014, all applications for the recognition of the Italian citizenship Jure Sanguinis (by descent) and Jure Matrimonii (for foreign national whose husband is an Italian citizen married prior to April 27, 1983) are subject to the PAYMENT OF A € 300 FEE (approx    Anyone over the age of 18, asking to be recognized as an Italian citizen, is subject to pay the consular fee. The fee is subject to change depending on the exchange rate. The application fee is NON REFUNDABLE, regardless of the outcome of the petition.

7. Eventually, when you receive your citizenship, you will incur fees to order your Italian Passport, which is approximately $145 for five years.

Finally the cost differs GREATLY if you do it yourself (with some help), versus hiring a company or a law firm that will do it for you.

To learn if you qualify or for more information, visit our ITALIAN DUAL CITIZENSHIP Section

© 2015 MY ITALIAN FAMILY, LLC. All rights reserved.

The length of time it takes to reach a goal should always be compared to a similar process. With that in mind, do you know how long it takes to obtain US citizenship for a foreigner? It's an average of about four to thirteen years or longer. So when you ask yourself the question: how long does the process of obtaining Italian Dual Citizenship jure sanguinis (by right of blood) take? The answer is WAY LESS than thirteen years, in fact, in most cases, less than four.

Let's analyze the process step by step:

1. Gathering Italian vital records to prove your Ancestor(s) was indeed born in Italy and if applicable, married there - An average of two (2) months.

2. Gathering of US Naturalization Records or proof of No-Naturalization which also includes certified copies of US Census records - An average of three (3) months.

3. Gathering of all US Vital records, issued in the correct format, with certification - The range is extremely wide based on where the request is sent, i.e. state level, township level, and of course which state and which township, but overall it can take an average of six (6) months. If US Vital records need to be amended to correct name or date errors, tack on another two (2) months.

4. Gathering the Apostilles or legalization of all US Vital Records (which sometime also includes Naturalization Records) - An average of one (1) month or less.

5. Translating all the US documents to Italian (depending on the translator) - An average of one (1) month or less.

Of course some steps may be taken at the same time: for instance since Apostilles do not need to be translated to Italian, you can start the translation of your US vital records to Italian while they are out for Apostille. 

So overall, the process of gathering documents is about six to twelve months, if you take into consideration that some documents may need to be amended.

Dual citizenship (also known as dual nationality) is allowed in the UK. This means you can be a British citizen and also a citizen of other countries.

British citizens over 18 born in the UK to Italian nationals registered with the Italian Consulate

Applicants over 18 of age born in the UK to Italian nationals registered with the AIRE office and with an Italian passport issued before 05.02.1992, whose birth certificate has never been registered in Italy, need to produce the following:

• An application form DULY COMPLETED AND UNSIGNED. The application must be signed in front of the officer during the appointment at the Consulate.

• Full birth certificate, Apostilled by the “The Legalisation Office” (Norfolk House (West) 437 Silbury Boulevard - Milton Keynes MK9 2AH - Tel. 037 00 00 22 44 - Fax: 01908295122 E-mail: [email protected]  Web-site: www.fco.gov.uk/legalisation) and translated into Italian.

• Proof of address (utility bill, bank statement etc)

• Current passport and a photocopy of it

• Consular fees of € 300,000 (at the amount in GBP based on the current exchange rate - cash or British debit card only) to be paid at the cashier's desk of the Consulate General. Payment information will be provided on the day of the appointment.

For more information, to download an application, or to make an appointment, please visit: http://www.conslondra.esteri.it/Consolato_Londra/Menu/I_Servizi/Per_i_ci...

All Resources

August 29, 2018
Article

To avoid the long wait time for appointments at the Italian Consulates here in the US, you can establish residency in Italy and apply for Italian Dual Citizenship in-person. We call this “FAST-TRACK”.

July 30, 2018
Resource

The Italian law requires that your Italy-born Ancestor did not become a naturalized US citizen (or citizen of any foreign country where he or she migrated to) before the birth of his or her son or daughter here in the US. Moreover, under the principle of “jure sanguinis”, i.e. continuity of blood, you, as the applicant, have to demonstrate that the descendants of the Italy-born Ancestor did not renounce their rights to Italian citizenship.

June 10, 2018
Article

A person with dual citizenship is a citizen of two countries at the same time. While the United States allows dual citizenship without necessarily promoting it, not all countries do. Fortunately, Italy, along with Australia, Canada, UK, Ireland and a few others allow dual nationality without any restrictions. 

There are several ways to obtain dual citizenship with Italy: 

1. Through Ancestry, i.e. jure sanguinis (by right of blood)

January 05, 2018
Article

Today, more and more applicants for Italian Dual Citizenship are faced with the decision to apply in their country of residence, United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil, etc. or to apply in Italy.

October 06, 2017
Article

My Italian Heritage always played an important role in my life from the way I was brought up to the way I valued family in my life. I wanted to apply for my Italian Dual Citizenship to solidify those feelings and allow me to live, study and work in Italy and other EU countries without the need of a Visa.

September 28, 2017
Article

An important decision for a family to make when seeking Italian Citizenship via jure sanguinis (citizenship by blood) is the organizing and sequencing of the process.  

Under the established law, every adult must apply on their own, apply through the Italian Consulate that has jurisdiction over them and must provide their own set of required documents.   All Italian Consulates require the applicant to provide documentation that the applicant is under the particular Consulate’s jurisdiction and usually this is demonstrated by government issued ID’s. 

September 05, 2017
Article

Have you ever wondered what an Apostille is and why it is required?

August 17, 2017
Article

In today’s world, we are accustomed to citizenship rules being applied to men and women equally.  That hasn’t always been the case neither in Italy, nor in the United States.

February 27, 2017
Article

Earlier this month, I had my long-awaited visit to the Italian Consulate in New York as part of my process for applying for Italian Dual Citizenship.

January 22, 2017
Article

Italian Dual Citizenship: Benefits, Eligibility requirements & Next Steps

November 09, 2016
Article

Obtaining Italian Dual Citizenship, “What’s in it for me?” and “Sounds good, but how much does it cost?”….

September 21, 2016
Article

If you want to apply to a specific Italian Consulate, for whatever reason, think again! As an applicant, you don’t have a choice as to where you can apply.

June 08, 2016
Article

Married couples often want to apply for their Italian dual citizenship at the same time, even if only one of them is qualified for citizenship jure sanguinis. In order for a spouse to apply through marriage, the couple must first be married three years and one spouse has to have Italian citizenship.
 

February 23, 2016
Article

Unless individuals seeking Italian citizenship via jure sanguinis have definitive proof or confirmation that their ancestor naturalized they should not automatically assume that by serving in the US armed forces their ancestor gave up his Italian citizenship. 

January 27, 2016
Article

The current law granting Italian citizenship jure sanguinis states that women could hold but not pass citizenship to children born before January 1, 1948, the date Italy became a Republic.

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