Italian Documents

If you are applying for Italian Dual Citizenship, you will need the Italian vital records for your Italy-born Ancestor(s). There is some essential information that's needed in order to get started. For instance, to order a birth record, the full name, the date of birth, the exact place of birth and the parents'names (if available) of your Italian Ancestor(s) are necessary. Remember: all family documents in Italy are ONLY maintained in the EXACT town of origin. Remember, Italian vital records are among the qualifying documents that have to be presented to the Italian Consulate, the day of your appointment. 

 

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In order to start a research project onsite in Italy or to order Italian vital records, you need to have some essential information of your Ancestor/s who left Italy, specifically:

  • Full Name
  • Date of Birth
  • EXACT Town of Birth (all family documents in Italy are only maintained in the EXACT town where the person was born)
  • Parents' Names (if available)

If you don’t have this information, you need to research the following sources:

Immigration Records

The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Inc has made available online FREE all the Ships Manifests for those who arrived in the U.S. through the port of Ellis Island from 1892 to 1957. You need to have the full name of your Ancestor who migrated from Italy, his/her approximate date of arrival and his/her approximate age at arrival in case there are several passengers with the same last name. The Manifest will list the Ancestor's full name, age, sex, profession, last residence in Italy, birthplace (listed after 1907), names and addresses of the relatives in the US, etc. Ellis Island Records are also available at Familysearch.org, Ancestry.com and many other websites. 

SSDI (Social Security Death Index)

The US Social Security Index is an index of several million deceased people who had social security numbers and whose deaths were reported to the Social Security Administration. The index lists deaths since 1962. However, the records include the original Social Security Application that your Ancestor would have completed in order to acquire a Social Security Number.  This procedure began in 1936.  To research your ancestor’s listing in the SSDI free of charge, CLICK HERE.

Once you find your Ancestor’s listing, you can order the original Application (SS-5).

By mail:

You should address your request to: Social Security Administration, OEO FOIA Workgroup, 300 N. Green Street, P.O. Box 33022, Baltimore, Maryland 21290-3022. There is a fee is $27, when the Social Security number is provided or $29 if the Social Security number is unknown or incorrect.

Online:

You can order the SS-5 Form online from the Social Security Administration at: https://secure.ssa.gov/apps9/eFOIA-FEWeb/internet/main.jsp. The usual timeline to get a response is about two weeks.

The SS-5 Form will include your Ancestor's Full Name, date of birth, place of birth, parents' names, SS# and more. 

CENSUS RECORDS

Only Federal Census Records starting from 1900 list more information such as date of immigration, profession, sex, color, birthplace (it's not uncommon to find "Italy" listed instead of the exact town of birth), naturalization information (A=Alien, PA=First Papers, NA=Naturalized), etc. U.S. Census Records are available online at FamilySearch.org (free site), National Archives (NARA), Ancestry.com and many others websites.

The estratto per riassunto dell'atto di nascita, or extract of a birth act (which is the format required by the Italian Consulate to process your application for Dual Citizenship), provides the following information: 

  • Name of the Comune and of the Province, Year, Part, Series and Record Number
  • Full name of the child
  • Place of birth (only the Comune is listed; usually not the Frazione or hamlet)
  • Date of Birth 
  • (Time of Birth)
  • Sex
  • Parent’s names
  • Side notation/s, i.e. any event such as marriage, death or loss of citizenship is listed in the side notation of the original birth act.

If a child was illegitimate, the civil vital registration records officer would list "unknown" under the parents' names. 

Birth records are issued in dual copy. One copy remains at the Comune, or Ufficio di Stato Civile, while the other copy is sent to the “Procura della Repubblica” (Country Court at province level). 

Ready to order your Italy-born Ancestor's BIRTH record for the purpose of Italian Dual Citizenship? CLICK HERE!

The estratto per riassunto dell'atto di matrimonio or extract of a marriage act (which is the format required by the Italian Consulate to process your Dual Citizenship application), provides the following information:

• Name of the Comune and of the Province, Year, Part, Series and Record Number

• Date (and time) of marriage

• Place of marriage (only the Comune is listed, seldom the hamlet or frazione is)

• Groom’s information, i.e. date of birth/age, place of birth (and place of residence)

• Bride’s information, i.e. name, date of birth/age, place of birth (and place of residence)

• (Names of the parents of the groom and the bride) 

The brackets identify information that can also be listed in the extract of a marriage act.

Marriage records are issued in dual copy: one copy remains at the Comune, or Ufficio di Stato Civile, and one is sent to the “Procura della Repubblica” (Country Court at province level). 

Ready to order your Italy-born Ancestor's MARRIAGE record for the purpose of Italian Dual Citizenship? CLICK HERE!

The estratto per riassunto dell'atto di morte or extract of the death act (which is the format required by the Italian Consulate to process your application for Dual Citizenship), provides the following information: 

  • Name of the Comune and of the Province, Year, Part, Series and Record Number
  • Full name 
  • Place of birth (only the Comune is listed and not the Frazione or hamlet)
  • Age
  • (Date of birth)
  • Civil Status
  • If married the death certificate will include the name of the husband or the wife of the deceased
  • Date and place of death 
  • (The deceased’s address) 

The brackets identify the information that can also be listed in the extract of a death act.

Death records are made in double copy: one copy remains at the Comune, or Ufficio di Stato Civile, while the other copy is sent to the “Procura della Repubblica” (Country Court at province level).

Ready to order your Italy-born Ancestor's DEATH record for the purpose of Italian Dual Citizenship application? CLICK HERE!

The Certificate of Citizenship is not the Naturalization Certificate issued by the USCIS here in the U.S. It is a certification issued by the local Italian Town hall stating that your Ancestor at the time of his/her migration was still an Italian citizen.

NOTE: Town halls do not have a common procedure regarding what to issue when it comes to Certificates of Citizenship:

  • They may issue a statement certifying that based on the records they have available (which is usually ONLY the birth certificate since people migrated away quite early) the person did not lose his/her Italian citizenship,
  • They may only issue the birth certificate which does NOT list a side notation with information on your Ancestor's loss of citizenship, OR
  • They may issue a declaration stating the reason why they cannot certify the person’s citizenship status.

Whichever document we receive you will have to present it together with our official request to the Italian Consulate the day of your appointment.

Ready to order your Italy-born Ancestor's CERTIFICATE OF CITIZENSHIP record for the purpose of Italian Dual Citizenship? CLICK HERE!

It is not uncommon to discover that first and last names are different from the original spelling found in the Italian vital records. Inconsistencies can also be found in the date of birth; US records (birth, marriage, death and naturalization records) may list different birthdates.

Although US records can be amended, with the exception of the Naturalization records that cannot be amended for someone who is deceased, it helps (and often it is required) to have the Italian town hall issue a certification known as Certificate Positive/Negative, or Certificate of Esatte Generalita’.

The Italian town hall will certify that there was only one person (listing the original first and last name, date of birth, place of birth, parents’ names and Birth Act No.) born there, while other individuals with incorrect name spellings (listing exactly which misspellings are found in the US documents) and incorrect birth dates (listing exactly which other dates are found in the US documents) were NOT born in that town.  

NOTE: This Certification does not replace the requirement of “amending” US records. For more information on how to amend US vital records, READ OUR ARTICLE 

Ready to order your Italy-born Ancestor's CERTIFICATE POSITIVE/NEGATIVE record for the purpose of Italian Dual Citizenship application? CLICK HERE!

Military and conscription records contain very precious genealogical information. They provide not only vital information on your ancestor but also physical information. 

Conscription records also called Registri di Leva or Liste di Estrazione di Leva list all Italian male-born from approximately 1855 (the imposition of the draft – conscription of all 18-years old males – dates back 1865), by year of birth, for each military district. The introduction of these records varies from geographical areas, but mostly they started around 1873, thus including all males born in 1855.

Military records were issued in dual copy; one is held in the military archive of each military district, the other is initially held by the Procura della Repubblica (Country Court at province level) and after 75 years, it is sent to the State Archive of the main province. Researching conscription records in the main provinces of the region of origin can be a unique way to start your research that otherwise would have been impossible (as far as town halls and parishes are concerned, you MUST know the comune of origin of your ancestor).

These records contain personal data that cannot be found in any other source, such as:

• Height

• Size of the chest

• Color and shape of hair, face, nose, and chin

• Eye color

• Skin color

• Condition of the teeth, 

• Birthmarks, if any

In addition, you will be able to find the following vital information:

• Draftee’s full name

• His parents’ names

• His place of birth

• His profession

• His education (whether he was able to read and write or not)

• Ability to perform military services 

• Date the service began

The most valuable Military Record is the Ruolo Matricolare which records all the developments in the military career, from promotions to changes in status. 

Do you want to get started? ORDER A MILITARY RECORD

All Resources

February 25, 2019
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The Anagrafe Office (Office of the Census or Demographics Office) is the repository of this record called Stato di Famiglia Storico (Historical State of the Family).  This document shows the composition of the family unit which includes the following information: 

February 25, 2019
Resource

Military and conscription records contain very precious genealogical information. They provide not only vital information on your ancestor but also physical information. 

February 25, 2019
Resource

It is not uncommon to discover that first and last names are different from the original spelling found in the Italian vital records. Inconsistencies can also be found in the date of birth; US records (birth, marriage, death and naturalization records) may list different birthdates.

February 25, 2019
Resource

The Certificate of Citizenship is not the Naturalization Certificate issued by the USCIS here in the U.S. It is a certification issued by the local Italian Town hall stating that your Ancestor at the time of his/her migration was still an Italian citizen.

NOTE: Town halls do not have a common procedure regarding what to issue when it comes to Certificates of Citizenship:

February 25, 2019
Resource

The estratto per riassunto dell'atto di morte or extract of the death act (which is the format required by the Italian Consulate to process your application for Dual Citizenship), provides the following information: 

February 25, 2019
Resource

The estratto per riassunto dell'atto di matrimonio or extract of a marriage act (which is the format required by the Italian Consulate to process your Dual Citizenship application), provides the following information:

• Name of the Comune and of the Province, Year, Part, Series and Record Number

• Date (and time) of marriage

• Place of marriage (only the Comune is listed, seldom the hamlet or frazione is)

• Groom’s information, i.e. date of birth/age, place of birth (and place of residence)

February 25, 2019
Resource

The estratto per riassunto dell'atto di nascita, or extract of a birth act (which is the format required by the Italian Consulate to process your application for Dual Citizenship), provides the following information: 

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